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Dev Talk #2: A Deep Dive into the Shipyard Update



Posted: //
Nov. 30, 2016, 12:46 p.m.



DEV TALK #2: A DEEP DIVE INTO THE SHIPYARD UPDATE

Timo sits down with Jonathan Lindsay, Executive Producer at YAGER, and Mike Donatelli, Creative Director at Six Foot, to share their ideas behind Dreadnought's recent mega-update, and what they hope for the future.

We released the Shipyard Update on Halloween, and it seems to have spooked some of you. This system represents a significant departure from how players progressed through the game before, but it was a necessary change. We’re currently in the process of iterating on and improving upon it, so it’s no surprise that Jonathan opens the conversation by addressing one of the big concerns the community has already brought forward: the Credit prices of modules: “After reducing the Credit cost for new ships, the prices for modules need to be modified too. We might need to take another look at the prices for ships as well since the overall costs have been adjusted.”

Finding Your Ship vs. Building Your Fleet

We’ve received a lot of feedback from players saying that they feel the need to hoard their credits to be able to purchase the ship in the next tier—and so that they can ultimately reach tier V. “As Timo and I heatedly discussed earlier, I levelled up my tier-II ships first and enjoyed equipping them with new and more powerful modules,” says Mike. He admits that players currently seem to be striving to get to the highest tier as fast as possible, but just getting a tier-V ship isn’t as helpful as you might think. Let’s say that you just started playing and have improved all the ships in your Recruit Fleet. Having a powerful Recruit Fleet means that you win more often than you would if you rushed up the tiers. With a more powerful and versatile fleet, you find yourself in a “rock, paper, scissors” situation—and you have the ability to adapt to the battle better than you could before.

“Trying to get to the top tier is a behavior that totally makes sense for an RPG,” Mike continues: “In that kind of game, you’re trying to get your character all the way to the end and be as powerful as possible. This works when you have only one character. In Dreadnought, you don’t just have one character—you have multiple ships and even multiple fleets that play differently from each other. Successful players will take advantage of that, because without a proper fleet, you’re going to lose more often than not. If all you bring is Artillery Cruisers or Dreadnoughts, your chances of winning go down because you're not versatile enough. Your enemies will be able to switch to other classes that you won’t be able to counter. That’s the “rock, paper, scissors” part of the game.”

So with the Shipyard Update, Dreadnought has shifted focus away from finding the one ship that best fits your playstyle to building and continually customizing a powerful, versatile fleet. Even with this shift in focus toward fleets, Jonathan and Mike agree that we still have to take a good, hard look at the current prices in the game. “For now, we’ve decided to go with reducing Credit costs. This is a small change that’s fairly easy to do, and we can probably have it live within the next two weeks. We can measure the effects for a bit, see where we are, and then go from there,” says Jonathan. To make sure that prices are right and don’t discourage people from investing in better modules and improving their fleets, we plan to monitor the costs of ships and modules as well as player behavior, and then make adjustments as needed.

The Layout of the Manufacturer Trees

There’s been some talk about how the layout of the Manufacturer Trees forces people to play certain classes. For example, having to go through Tactical Cruisers to get to the light Destroyers makes some feel pushed towards a grind and faced with a wall that they simply don’t want to overcome.

Jonathan agrees: “Yes, this can definitely be annoying for existing players, because they have a favorite ship that they played before these changes were made.” But it’s quite a different experience for people new to the game, he says. A new player doesn’t know which ship is going to be their favorite—whether they’ll prefer the medium, light or heavy Destroyer, for example. Nor do they know how to handle certain classes, like the light or heavy Destroyer. One is a bit squishy and dies easily, and if you don't know how to use energy to make yourself move faster and fly evasively, you'll die a lot. Similarly, the heavy Destroyer is quite slow and new players often feel like they’re barely moving. In short, it’s beneficial to introduce players to certain ships once they’ve improved their skills and moved through some of the Manufacturer Tree.

However, this brings up another question: Why not have Manufacturer Trees that branch out from the medium destroyer to the light and heavy versions? Why did we lock these subclasses behind other classes?

“If we put all the ships from one class into a single Manufacturer Tree, then we couldn't really do the manufacturers the way we wanted to. On top of that, the game is not about single ships. It's about your fleet. And if you just went from Destroyer to Destroyer to Destroyer, you would have nothing but Destroyers and would be less effective in battle because you couldn’t react to the other team at all,” says Donatelli.

“When I first started playing the game, all I played was Destroyers”, Mike admits. “Even after the Shipyard Update came around, I started playing only Destroyers again. Then we were playing against QA (who are really good). I realized that I needed to switch to a Tactical Cruiser to heal our Dreadnought if I wanted to win that match, but I only had a low-tier healer in my fleet, with no good modules at all. So I realized I had to use the credits I was saving to buy the next Destroyer to improve my healer. I then realized that healing was actually pretty fun and spent more credits on Tactical Cruisers and modules to add to them. A similar thing happened to me when I played against a bunch of Artillery Cruisers. I spent some Credits and got a Corvette to be able to counter them.”

The design of the Manufacturer Trees is intended to introduce new players to the ship classes, have them advance a bit in each one, and then help them decide what they want to specialize in. Each Manufacturer Tree presents players with starting ships that are easy to get the hang of—and serves to guide them toward assembling a diverse fleet they might not have put together otherwise. This is designed to improve replayability as well as retention.

“A big problem that was reported to us by our community was that the Credit costs for purchasing ships in the next tier—and for branching out within a Tech Tree—were too high,” says Jonathan. “Now the costs have been drastically reduced. Branching out and trying new classes are not as expensive anymore.” It’s also important to note that, in a ship’s Tech Tree, players only have to research items using XP to unlock the next ship. They don’t have to purchase any of them (using Credits). This might be useful for anyone who’s dead-set on avoiding a certain ship.

So what about the fact that the game is called Dreadnought, but there’s no Dreadnought-class ship available at the beginning of the game? Wouldn’t a new player want to play the namesake of the game? “That’s absolutely right, and we’re currently working on putting a Dreadnought back at the beginning of the game,” says Mike. “Absolutely, it needs to be available right away,” Jonathan agrees. “We’ll fix that.”

Module Choices at Lower Tiers

A lot of our veteran players have told us that they’re disappointed by the lack of module customization options in the lower tiers. Jonathan says that YAGER would like to bring secondary weapons back to tier II, but they are currently double-checking the balancing that would be required for such a change. “The other point is that customization is an important pillar of the game, but it's something that can be really overwhelming for new players,” he says. “You have so much to deal with in terms of just flying your ship, managing your energy, learning your modules. Then, on top of that, there is a metagame where you can choose modules, many of which are beyond what you need to learn starting out, like the Plasma Ram, which takes time to learn how to use effectively.” This has been a big part of Dreadnought, but an overwhelming one for new players. This is something we want to ease new captains into slowly now and unlock over time. “Once you reach tier III, which doesn’t take long at all anymore, you start to get really interesting choices in terms of what you can equip on your ship. At tier IV, you have tons of choices, and at tier V, you get ridiculously diverse Tech Trees,” Jonathan continues.

So this brings us back to the topic we brought up earlier: the shift away from personalizing your ship to building a powerful and versatile fleet. Maybe this is something that we have not really been communicating properly? “The game was like that before,” says Jonathan. “You had a fleet before the new system was in place.” But Mike has a different perspective: “True, but most people concentrated much more on ‘their ship’. They effectively picked a class and played it like it was their character, and the same class would be placed in their fleet multiple times with different loadouts. Everybody picked a class, this guy here was THE HEALER, the other guy was THE TANK and when they grouped up that's what they were. They played their class. The idea of ‘the fleet’ was not that you built a badass fleet, but that you used the fleet to have multiple version of your class.”

And this is a point that has now changed. At least in the lowest tiers, it’s not about making one ship your own, but about putting together your fleet. Later, when you reach higher tiers, your customization options open up again and you have even more options to adapt to different situations. But you’ll still need to bring multiple ship classes to a match and switch classes to counter your opponents. “Not only does this keep the match even. It makes battles more interesting because everything is constantly changing,” Mike says.

Dealing with Ships of Higher Tiers

Another point of criticism we’ve heard quite a lot (and rightfully so) is that, after the release of the Shipyard Update, it is possible for tier-I ships to encounter tier-IV Hero Ships in battle. This being generally possible was by design. However, these matches were not intended to be like this.

Being able to punch above your weight class, so to speak, is intended and is an integral part of the matchmaking system. It allows a talented player with a lower-tier ship to face off against an enemy with a numerical advantage, but a lack of experience. This rewards the more experienced player with more points—and more Credits—at the end of the match. For example, if you defeat someone in the same tier as you, you get 100 points. If a tier-II manages to kill a tier-IV, you get 164 points. In short, when a tier-II player takes out a tier-IV player, they get 64% more points and Credits.

That’s why each Fleet Level includes more than one tier, and why tiers II and IV are part of two fleets. “For me, the idea is that you can play Veteran and max out your tier-IV ships,” says Mike. “And then, once you decide you’re ready, you queue up for a Legendary match with your fleet of pimped-out tier IVs. You'll have a better chance at winning than a player who rushed up to tier V and has no additional modules unlocked.”

“Also, we’re currently taking another look at the numerical power differences between each of the tiers,” Jonathan adds. “We’re planning on making the jump from one tier to the next less severe.” Our current focus is to make some adjustments to the lower tiers, since those are the ones that we’ve received the most feedback on since the update. However, tier balancing is something that we plan on recalibrating over time to make sure that every tier is appropriately
powerful and fun to play—and that there’s always an incentive to progress higher.

Maintenance

Ok, let’s get to the elephant in the room: maintenance costs. “First of all, you need to know that maintenance was done in the wrong way,” Jonathan interjects right away. “We put a fixed maintenance cost on every fleet, depending on whether it was Veteran or Legendary. However, this cost needs to be based on the ships that you've used in battle.” This is a change that we’ve been working on for a while. We’re currently testing it, so it should be in the game soon.

So, for example, your maintenance costs will be lower if you have more tier-II ships in your Veteran Fleet than if you have all tier-III or tier-IV ships. “It’s already the case,” Jonathan continues, “that your income for playing tier II is lower than for tier III. Going to the next-highest tier awards you with 10% more Credits. Of course, that’s just the base calculation—specific numbers depend on how well you do in a match. So, at the moment, if you go into a Veteran match with tier-II ships, you're actually paying the maintenance cost that was supposed to be for an all-tier-IV Veteran fleet.”

This basically means that, in a case like this, you’re playing on a tier II-level, but you’re paying tier-IV maintenance prices? “Yes,” Jonathan says. “And that’s wrong. It has already been changed, just not yet implemented. It definitely needs to scale depending on the tiers of the ships in your fleet.”

We think you’ll be happy once maintenance costs are adjusted, but the question still remains: why were they set up like this in the first place? The short answer: “It’s a monetization mechanic,” says Jonathan. “I've read a lot of posts about it by now and I know people are unhappy about it. A lot of players understand why it was put in, but they would like to see it change. It's just too expensive, and that's one of the things we're changing in the next iteration.”

Mike lets us know that, in a game like Dreadnought, there are always Credit faucets and Credit sinks. “Credits are part of the progression system that you can win a lot more of when you play well and win. In Dreadnought, that’s the Credit faucet. Ship and module purchases, as well as maintenance costs, are designed to be Credit sinks.” “Maintenance adds a certain risk / reward challenge to playing a match,” Jonathan adds. “Especially in Legendary, where you can make a lot more Credits—but have to pay a lot in maintenance if you lose.” That being said, we don’t expect people to play Legendary all the time—the game is actually not designed for that. If you only want to play Legendary, you'll probably run into credit problems pretty quickly if you're not an exceptional player with a well-equipped fleet.

Mike: “It is a monetization method, no argument there, because the game needs to be viable. We had planned to have the option to convert GP to Credits available when we first launched the Shipyard Update, but the conversion system just wasn’t ready to be released.” We have seen this point come up multiple times in the community. Players have asked for an option to convert their GP to Credits. This had been planned from the beginning, but since a mechanic like that involves Grey Box Points, we need to make sure that it's working bug-free. And while this option would make progression a little more flexible, it’s important to note that converting GP to Credits does not alleviate the XP requirements for researching a new module or ship.

“This conversion option should be included in the same update that fixes the maintenance costs, probably within the next few weeks,” says Mike. “Of course, this is looking a bit problematic now that we're coming out with that mechanic after the progression system was already released,” he laughs.

Of course, maintenance isn’t the only monetized aspect of Dreadnought. Two key monetization mechanics are Elite Status, which grants you and your team a higher rate of XP and Credits after battle, and the ability to purchase uniquely designed Hero Ships that can give you direct entry into a new Fleet Level. And there’s also the option to customize your ships with vanity items, as well as the ability to convert Ship XP on a Veteran-Status ship into Free XP (which you can use to research items on any ship). In short, we designed Dreadnought to be fun and rewarding for all players, while making sure that those who choose not to spend money don’t suffer any disadvantages when facing off in a match against paying players.

Selling Ships for Credits

In addition to GP to Credit conversion, Jonathan says that there’s another feature that he’d like to see in-game. “I’d really like to see the ability to sell your ships for Credits as soon as possible! It would be perfect if we could get that in with the same update,” he adds. This is an option that people would love to see. The idea would be that you could sell a ship you don't want to play anymore and receive some of the Credits you initially invested in it. We are currently trying to implement this idea and the GP to Credit conversion in the same update.

Officer Briefings

Ok, we’ve talked about most of the big topics already, but one really big one remains: officer briefings. Mike lets us know that we are currently looking into putting Officer Briefings into their own tree, independent from the Manufacturer Trees. You would be able to unlock more (and better) Briefings as you level up. However, there would be some kind of limitation as to which Briefings can be used in which tiers—for example, to make sure that tier-IV Briefings don’t bring Recruit matches out of balance.

“There is a plan to introduce a crew progression to the game,” Mike lets us know. “We want you to be able to outfit your fleet with a customized, highly specialized crew. That's in the roadmap for 2017—a crew progression system with a lot of depth.”

Looking Beyond the Shipyard

How’s that for a little “light reading?” We know it’s a lot to digest (a ship-load, really), but we do hope we’ve addressed most of your concerns and provided some clarification on the decisions we’ve made—and the intent behind them.

In the weeks since the Shipyard Update went live, we have seen that the revamped progression system performs better than the previous one, new player retention has improved and that the game is stickier than it was overall. So, in short, this new system is here to stay, and we look forward to hearing your feedback so that we can steadily tweak and improve it. We will continue to listen, and with your help, get the game where we all want it to be.


Senior Community Manager, Europe "Everything Is A Nail. All You Need Is A Hammer."


Posted: //
Nov. 30, 2016, 2:19 p.m.



DN_Timo#1002 posted (#post-71417)

Mike: “It is a monetization method, no argument there, because the game needs to be viable. We had planned to have the option to convert GP to Credits available when we first launched the Shipyard Update, but the conversion system just wasn’t ready to be released.” We have seen this point come up multiple times in the community. Players have asked for an option to convert their GP to Credits. This had been planned from the beginning, but since a mechanic like that involves Grey Box Points, we need to make sure that it's working bug-free. And while this option would make progression a little more flexible, it’s important to note that converting GP to Credits does not alleviate the XP requirements for researching a new module or ship.

(...)

That being said, we don’t expect people to play Legendary all the time—the game is actually not designed for that. If you only want to play Legendary, you'll probably run into credit problems pretty quickly if you're not an exceptional player with a well-equipped fleet.

Those two together seem a bit misworded. I mean, if I can just push money into the game to get enough credits to stay in T5, that means the game allows me to do it. When it is not designed for that, that should create problems. Some people will also see this as pay to win, or if you lock out T5s, where is the reason to using them? So I would like to know how T5 matching will work if there are not enough T5 players, or people that queue with their legendary fleet.

Could you not just clearly state, if you want to play T5 without the fear of getting locked out, just get elite-status? A more open way of saying, we want you to pay for it, would be appreciated on my side.


Recruit Engineer


Posted: //
Nov. 30, 2016, 2:23 p.m.



Jawayne#8001 posted (#post-71419)

Could you not just clearly state, if you want to play T5 without the fear of getting locked out, just get elite-status? A more open way of saying, we want you to pay for it, would be appreciated on my side.

Great question Jawayne.
Also,bringing secondaries from tier 2 would be indeed nice,what about customizations on looks?will we get it implemented in the future or it will stay locked to tier 5 as it is now?


"The First Of His Name"


Posted: //
Nov. 30, 2016, 2:34 p.m.



  1. It was designed from the beginning to be about YOUR ship, YOUR garage kit. With the update you actually took more versatility from us then you thought you added.

  2. Stop Adding features from World of Tanks. They hurt and most beside the mindless fanboys who already invested 1000$ +++ hate it.

  3. NO, because NO

  4. sight who even are those people? Some literally-who in YAGER and some guy who ruined Wild Star, great.

  5. IF any of the in Point 4 mentioned persons are present on a Roundtable than I would like to have them explain why the First Progression System wasn't viable by going an Rocket League approach with Chests & Premium Skin Buy options and keeping the game more close to an EA-Sport than some Arcade casual WoT game, where you can be a dreaded Light Destroyer Captain, a very talented Monarch pilot, a insane Aion commander.
    Think DotA, LoL, Rocket League, fun team competitions enhanced by PvE Modes with Leaderboards.

The game had promises but you ruined it by enforcing WoT monetization. (I hope you notice how much I hate WoT)
The new Player influx will not help you (if there was one, I didn't notice) if they all stop playing at T4 because the outlooks is just plain bad.


For the weeb in all of us! Anime Skins & Decals!
https://www.greybox.com/dreadnought/en/forum/topic/4472/
DESS! DESS! DESS!


Posted: //
Nov. 30, 2016, 2:35 p.m.



Hmmm I had the thought of wanting to have a diverse fleet but it was the tier power and maintenance cost that jacked it up. Seeing those will be adjusted makes me still optimistic. I'll stick it out


you won't escape my Frightning bolts!!!


Posted: //
Nov. 30, 2016, 2:36 p.m.


Updated //
Dec. 1, 2016, 11:23 a.m.

“Trying to get to the top tier is a behavior that totally makes sense for an RPG,” Mike continues: “In that kind of game, you’re trying to get your character all the way to the end and be as powerful as possible. This works when you have only one character. In Dreadnought, you don’t just have one character—you have multiple ships and even multiple fleets that play differently from each other. Successful players will take advantage of that, because without a proper fleet, you’re going to lose more often than not. If all you bring is Artillery Cruisers or Dreadnoughts, your chances of winning go down because you're not versatile enough. Your enemies will be able to switch to other classes that you won’t be able to counter. That’s the “rock, paper, scissors” part of the game.”

If this is truly how you want the game to work may I suggest something?
Currently there is no mechanical advantage associated with having a diverse fleet. This in turn makes it seem like your words and your actions are not in sync.
You can say things like

Successful players will take advantage of that, because without a proper fleet, you’re going to lose more often than not.

all you want, but that is a purely subjective view. I think most players are going to find that they like or dislike certain classes or specific ships and thus will not want to play them regardless of whether or not it increases their win ratio. If they don't want to play them then it follows that they will not want to spend credits (much less real currency) on them.

If you had a passive bonus, a "fleet bonus" or something, to mechanically reinforce your view of diverse fleets this would not be such a big discrepancy between thoughts and actions. If it were me I would give small bonuses depending on the number of specific classes included in the fleet.

Dreadnought: + % hull points per Dreadnought in Fleet
Destroyers: + % main weapon damage per Destroyer in Fleet
Tactical Cruisers: + % module cooldown per Tac cruiser in Fleet
Artillery Cruisier: + flat max range per Arty in Fleet
Corvette: + flat max speed per Corvette in Fleet

This system could be further refined with combos, different and additional bonuses depending on the numbers.
Something like: 2 Destroyers, 1 Artillery -> + flat lateral thruster power / turn speed (random example)
It took me all of 30 seconds of thought after reading your statements, collective dev/design team, to come up with a rough draft of a possible solution for the apparent dissonance between your stated intentions and your implemented "actions". This suggests to me that if you really intended for the game to work the way you have stated then it would work that way. Please stop being disingenuous with your communications. If you really mean what you have told us then you need to show that. Having been a tester/founder since alpha I have already given up on the game itself, it is far passed the point of being savable. At this point I'm only interested in watching the progress of this development process, and maybe trying to suggest something here and there.

--TLDR without an in game system to mechanically back up your goal of having each player build a fleet instead of play "their ship" you are just blowing hot air and hoping the playerbase will accept it as the new meta (also a personal rant at the end).


Posted: //
Nov. 30, 2016, 2:46 p.m.


Updated //
Nov. 30, 2016, 2:47 p.m.

Just no. I don't keep playing (or even paying for) this.


Suddenly the sun should shine through the clouds, an eagle should come out of the sky and take maintenance away beyond the horizon never to be seen again...


Posted: //
Nov. 30, 2016, 3:14 p.m.


Updated //
Nov. 30, 2016, 3:15 p.m.

How’s that for a little “light reading?” We know it’s a lot to digest (a ship-load, really), but we do hope we’ve addressed most of your concerns and provided some clarification on the decisions we’ve made—and the intent behind them.

It has not addressed my concerns and has only multiplied them.

This system represents a significant departure from how players progressed through the game before, but it was a necessary change.

No it wasn't.

You are literally killing your game slowly and you are blind to it. People who enjoy progression systems similar to World of Tanks etc are already playing those games. You are trying to attract the people who DON'T enjoy those progression systems. That market is already tapped to capacity.

You have to take the game in a fundamentally different direction.

He admits that players currently seem to be striving to get to the highest tier as fast as possible, but just getting a tier-V ship isn’t as helpful as you might think.

In Dreadnought, you don’t just have one character—you have multiple ships and even multiple fleets that play differently from each other.

So with the Shipyard Update, Dreadnought has shifted focus away from finding the one ship that best fits your playstyle to building and continually customizing a powerful, versatile fleet.

Nobody cares for your vision of the game. The only thing that matters is the way the players are playing. And currently you have built something that actively punishes players for playing the way that they want to play. The vast majority of people are not caring about building a fleet. We just want to play an enjoyable space game. Stop putting walls up in front of that experience.

A new player doesn’t know which ship is going to be their favorite—whether they’ll prefer the medium, light or heavy Destroyer, for example.

"So lets put a huge grind wall in front of them finding the ship that they will enjoy which will keep them playing"

Seriously, really really think about what you're doing from the perspective of a new player and you are again only putting up walls in front of people's enjoyment of the game.

Similarly, the heavy Destroyer is quite slow and new players often feel like they’re barely moving.

So they will play the ship once and then try a different ship until they find one they like.

“When I first started playing the game, all I played was Destroyers”, Mike admits. “Even after the Shipyard Update came around, I started playing only Destroyers again.

Literally zero people care Mike.

The design of the Manufacturer Trees is intended to introduce new players to the ship classes, have them advance a bit in each one, and then help them decide what they want to specialize in.

Intended goal not achieved. Start from scratch please.

“A big problem that was reported to us by our community was that the Credit costs for purchasing ships in the next tier—and for branching out within a Tech Tree—were too high,” says Jonathan. “Now the costs have been drastically reduced. Branching out and trying new classes are not as expensive anymore.”

Yes it is, the grind is absolutely horrific.

At tier IV, you have tons of choices, and at tier V, you get ridiculously diverse Tech Trees,” Jonathan continues.

Why are you locking the most interesting part of your game behind literal months of grinding. Is your goal to have a game that fizzles and dies weeks after launch? You NEED to get people INTO the AWESOME ships STRAIGHT away so they can start wrecking face.

Please, the Tier system is literally killing your game's potential.

So this brings us back to the topic we brought up earlier: the shift away from personalizing your ship to building a powerful and versatile fleet. Maybe this is something that we have not really been communicating properly?

Yeah, you have failed to communicate this. But you have also failed to listen that nobody wants this.

Being able to punch above your weight class, so to speak, is intended and is an integral part of the matchmaking system.

Transparent and laughable. Anyone who has actually played the games knows for a FACT that Tier 3 ships will absolutely CRUSH tier 2 ships. Let alone Tier 4 ships CRUSHING tier 2 and usually tier 3 ships. Just admit you want people who pay for the best ships to feel good stomping free players.

Ok, let’s get to the elephant in the room: maintenance costs. “First of all, you need to know that maintenance was done in the wrong way,” Jonathan interjects right away. “We put a fixed maintenance cost on every fleet, depending on whether it was Veteran or Legendary. However, this cost needs to be based on the ships that you've used in battle.” This is a change that we’ve been working on for a while. We’re currently testing it, so it should be in the game soon.

No you fools. Maintenance just needs to go. Remove it please. There is nothing fun or rewarding about maintenance.

“It’s a monetization mechanic,” says Jonathan. “I've read a lot of posts about it by now and I know people are unhappy about it. A lot of players understand why it was put in, but they would like to see it change. It's just too expensive, and that's one of the things we're changing in the next iteration.”

Please just get rid of it. We all know why you implemented it. Just reduce the rewards and increase the elite bonus. Taking value away from free players does not GIVE value to Elite players.

That being said, we don’t expect people to play Legendary all the time—the game is actually not designed for that.

This is so incredibly out of touch with what the community wants I don't know whether to laugh or cry.

Nobody wants to derp about in garbage little tier-1-3 ships. We want to play in the good ships. Because thats where the game is most fun. Stop locking fun behind paywalls and grind wallls or your game will die. The process to get there needs to be fun and right now it isn't.

We had planned to have the option to convert GP to Credits available when we first launched the Shipyard Update, but the conversion system just wasn’t ready to be released.

The second you tie Credits to GP the game is p2w and dead. The very second that happens its over and irreversibly dead. This game is for Western AudiencesIt seems. Western Audiences do not LIKE p2w.


Posted: //
Nov. 30, 2016, 3:17 p.m.



so lets get this right:
- you want us to upgrade multiple ships buuuuttt
* you want to allow us to sell our ships so we can focus on getting that one ship we want and get rid of the ships we dont want (lmao)

  • you say player retention is better and all: but virtualy nobody wants to stay arround to even try it :p

  • "Everybody picked a class, this guy here was THE HEALER, the other guy was THE TANK and when they grouped up that's what they were" < how would that be changed now? the higher tier each guy is: the better their combo, they are still doing the exact same thing now because you rewarded them even more for it with tiers

  • "It allows a talented player with a lower-tier ship to face off against an enemy with a numerical advantage, but a lack of experience" if you raised exp requirement alot and dropped credit cost to a point where players are always having more credits then exp, you still make the irl cash since people have to pay gp to convert exp> but you would also have a situation where players no longer feel they are suffering if they spend the credits to actualy get upgrades while they are grinding


World of dreadnoughts ftw!


Posted: //
Nov. 30, 2016, 3:19 p.m.


Updated //
Nov. 30, 2016, 3:19 p.m.

TBH the game is dead to me until the Shipyard update is reverted and I'm actively advising everyone I know to avoid it.

Admit you screwed up.

For god's sake I can't even put 5$ to get a week of premium because 5$ gets me 500GP when I need 600GP to get a week.

You could not be any more transparent with how money grubbing you are being and the potential community you will get, and the one you have now will come to hate you for it and forget your game in the sea of terrible clones.

Its so sad because the game has legitimate potential to be incredibly fun.

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